Educational Articles

Treatment

  • Acepromazine is used as a sedative and a pre-anesthetic agent. It also possesses the following properties: prevents vomiting, prevents muscle spasms, alleviates itching as a result of skin irritation and decreases temperature. Acepromazine may be used to help manage feline urinary tract disease.

  • This medicine may be prescribed to treat glaucoma – a disease of the eye that increases intraocular pressure and produces defects in the field of vision. Acetazolamide will reduce the amount of pressure in the eye.

  • Acupuncture is one aspect of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) that focuses on restoring the energy balance in the body to promote healing. The technique requires the insertion of fine needles into the dog’s body at specified points, called acupuncture points, where nerves and blood vessels converge. It is often used to treat dogs with arthritis and joint inflammation and may reduce the amount of medication a dog needs for these conditions. This handout explains how the treatment works and what to expect when your pet sees a veterinary acupuncturist.

  • Albuterol is a medication that relaxes the muscles of the airways and improves breathing. Albuterol relieves the cough associated with asthma.

  • The information below is a general guide for treating allergies in cats.

  • Allopurinol is an oral medication typically used to prevent uric acid and calcium oxalate stones in dogs. It is also used off-label to treat leishmaniasis and gout in dogs and other species. Side effects are uncommon but may involve stomach upset. Caution must be taken when allopurinol is used in conjunction with certain other medications. It should not be used in pets with liver or kidney dysfunction or in red-tailed hawks.

  • Aluminum hydroxide is used to reduce hyperphosphatemia (elevated blood levels of phosphate) in patients with kidney failure. Aluminum salts work by reducing the amount of phosphorus absorbed from the intestine by physically binding to dietary phosphorus.

  • An aortic thromboembolism results when a blood clot is dislodged and travels through the aorta, becoming lodged in a distant location. This causes severely reduced blood flow to the tissues receiving blood from that particular part of the aorta, leading to decreased oxygen in the tissues. Mixed breed cats, Abyssinian, Ragdoll, and Birmans are the most commonly affected. Sudden paralysis and pain, usually in the rear legs, are the most common clinical signs of aortic thromboembolism, although weakness and lameness may be seen. Other signs may include decreased or absent pulses in the femoral arteries of the rear legs, rapid breathing or difficulty breathing, vocalization from pain, vomiting, and the nailbeds and footpads may be pale or bluish. Initially, cats may need to be treated as inpatients. Drugs to prevent platelets from clumping together will be prescribed. The expected course of this disorder is days to weeks for full recovery of function to the legs, but the prognosis in general is very poor.

  • Topical ear medications are often necessary to treat inflammatory or infectious ear conditions properly. Some cats will tolerate the administration of liquids or ointments in their ears while others may become fractious.

  • Topical ear medications are necessary for the treatment of most ear conditions in dogs. This article provides step-by-step instructions on how to apply ear medications along with precautions. Tips are also given to reduce your dog’s anxiety with ear treatment.