Educational Articles

Care & Wellness

  • Bearded dragons have several unique problems; understanding these problems will allow you to better care for your pet and minimize future health care problems. These problems include Salmonella, avascular necrosis, abscesses, and dystocia.

  • There are numerous products on the market that have been designed to help prevent undesirable behavior in dogs. Leashes, harnesses, and head halters are needed to keep pets under control, especially when outdoors.

  • While punishment can be effective at decreasing those behaviors that are undesirable, if it is not administered properly it can aggravate existing problems and cause new ones.

  • There are a number of excellent books and training guides available that are intended to teach pet owners how to apply the basic principles of learning and training in a humane, effective, and logical manner.

  • There are two methods to prevent estrus, or "heat," in a female dog: surgery and medical management using hormonal drugs.

  • When the digestive tract is upset, vomiting and diarrhea may result. Since the causes of these symptoms are varied, it’s best to consult a veterinarian. Often, a bland diet is recommended to rest the digestive tract and to decrease vomiting and diarrhea. Bland diets consist of a single easily digestible protein source and a simple carbohydrate. Pet owners may prepare bland diets at home or choose one of the many commercially available diets.

  • Many owners say that they will never leave their dog in boarding kennels. However, situations may occur in which you are unable to take your dog with you, and boarding kennels may be your best alternative.

  • Weight-conscious people are familiar with BMI (Body Mass Index) as a yardstick to identify ideal weight. There is a way to measure the body condition of our furry friends, too. The pet version of BMI is called BCS (Body Condition Score) which is a quantitative yet subjective method for evaluating body fat.

  • Breeding cats and raising kittens can be an extremely rewarding experience or it may result in frustration and failure. The following information is provided in order to increase your chances of success and make the experience more enjoyable and safe.

  • You can place most puppies in their new homes at around eight to ten weeks of age, ideally after ten weeks of age to ensure proper weaning and maximum social development. Treating for worms and first vaccinations should occur before puppies are placed in their new homes.